Denver On Speed

According to the Denver Business Journal, last month Denver was the fastest selling housing market in the nation, with nearly half of homes on the market going under contract in just 6 days, down from an average of 11 days from Listing to Under Contract at the same time last year.

If you are listing your home for sale and staying in the Denver Metro Area, you may want to consider putting the cart before the horse, and pursuing your next home before you sell your current home.

Things to consider as a Seller in a fast-paced market:

  • Talk to your Realtor about including a contingency clause in your Contract to Buy & Sell; the Closing Date on the sale of your home will be determined by the forthcoming Closing Date on your next home.
  • Even if you aren’t comfortable making an offer before your home is Under Contract, begin searching for your next home (if you’re staying in the area) as soon as you begin preparing to list.
  • Have a Plan B — and maybe a Plan C for good measure.
    • If your home sells before you secure your next residence, can you stay in a residential hotel, or crash with a friend for a bit?
    • If you need to rent while you continue your search, what will this cost?
    • Where will you store your stuff if it takes time to land your next home?
    • Will temporary housing affect your commute?
    • Will you be able to rent within your current school district, if it takes time to find your next house?

As a Seller, the Denver housing market is highly in your favor, and it’s an exciting (and potentially profitable) time to sell your home. If you’re staying in the area and looking to upsize, downsize or transfer to another area of the city, you’ll want to work with your Realtor to plan the details of your “next” so every aspect of your sale, and the transition that follows, is as close to ideal as possible.

Thinking about making a move? In this marketplace, you’ll need an expert guide! Let me know how I can help.

Jack Meyers

The Meyers Group
jackestate@aol.com 
303.263.3050
Twitter: @jackestate

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Ways to Save on Homeowner’s Insurance

It’s time once again for everyone’s #favorite: Homeowner’s Insurance! I know…property insurance isn’t the sexiest Real Estate-related topic out there, but if you’ve found a just-right home, moved yourself in, and filled it with the best appliances, fixtures and furniture you can afford + all your favorite tchotchkes, you’ll want to have a reasonable level of protection in case disaster strikes. The great news is there are ways to streamline the cost of homeowner’s insurance while still maintaining optimal coverage.

6 Ways to Save on Homeowner’s Insurance

  1. Ask your Agent. Chances are good you qualify for one or more discounts, but you don’t get what you don’t ask for. Ask your agent point blank what discounts you may qualify for, or if you can do anything specific to qualify for additional savings.
  2. Bundle to Save. If you are able to insure your home, vehicle or health through the same company, go for it! Shop around to find out which agencies offer the best multiple policy savings.
  3. Raise your Deductible. As with most types of insurance, a higher deductible = lower premiums. Before making this change, educate yourself on how this will impact items like broken windows or minor damage from leaking pipes, as items like this will more than likely be out of pocket with a higher deductible.
  4. Pay off your Mortgage. Are you laughing at that one? As with any major asset, when you pay off your home, your premiums will likely decrease.
  5. Compare Annually to Save. Set a calendar reminder once a year to shop around and make sure you are getting the best rates. It may not be worth the hassle to save a couple bucks a month, but if you are diligent, you may turn up savings of as much as 10-15%, and that adds up. If you’ve stayed with the same company for a long time, ask about loyalty discounts.
  6. Install a Security System. Installing and maintaining a recognized security system may save you as much as 5% with some companies. Before you shop for an alarm system, talk to your insurance provider to find out which products qualify and how much you could save before you sign a contract for services.

Do you have questions that can only be answered by a qualified insurance professional? I’m happy to refer you to a few great providers. Let me know how I can help!

Jack Meyers

The Meyers Group
jackestate@aol.com 
303.263.3050
Twitter: @jackestate

Property Insurance Check-Up

After Monday’s hailstorm did extensive damage across Metro Denver, damaging shops and homes, and causing car accidents, many people are making calls to their insurance providers. If a disaster happened to your home, do you know, for sure, that you’re adequately covered?

Here’s a rundown of Property Insurance Basics you need to know:

  1. You don’t have to own your home to need insurance. Many landlords require renters insurance, and a minimal investment in rental coverage can offer a lot of coverage, in case an incident occurs. If your apartment building burns down with all your stuff inside, renters insurance can help you replace your property, as an example.
  2. Standard home owner’s insurance policies cover the following: Interior or Exterior Damage due to weather, fire, vandalism or other covered disasters. You’ll be compensated so your home can be repaired or, if necessary, rebuilt. Flood and earthquake insurance require additional, specialty coverage. Garages, sheds or any structures not directly connected to your home, will require an addendum in order to be covered.                                                                              Loss or damage to your personal property, including clothing, furniture, appliances and most of the other contents of your home, assuming the damage occurs as part of a covered disaster. According to the Insurance Information Institute, most insurance companies will provide coverage for 50–70% of the amount of insurance you have on the structure of your home. If you own high value jewelry, antiques or electronics, you will want to provide documentation of these items to your insurance company prior to the need for a claim.

    Personal liability for damage or injuries caused by you or your family. Liability coverage protects you from lawsuits filed by others, including pet issues. Insurance experts recommend having at least $300k worth of coverage, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

    Hotel or house rental while your home is repaired. This type of insurance coverage is known as additional living expenses (ALE). ALE reimburses you for rent, hotel room, restaurant meals and other costs you incur while waiting for your home to become habitable again.

  3. Different types of coverage include: Actual Cash Coverage (the current value of your home and its contents, minus depreciation); Replacement Coverage (actual cash value without subtracting depreciation); Guaranteed Replacement Cost (comprehensive coverage for the actual replacement cost of your home and personal property – including inflation).
  4. What ISN’T included? Natural disasters, acts of God, acts of war
  5. How much does it cost? The average yearly premium cost for U.S. homeowners insurance in 2013 (the latest year for which data is available) was $1,096, according to a 2016 report by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, but premiums vary widely and depend on multiple factors, including your state. Price will of course be determined by how much coverage you buy, a decision you can only make after evaluating the market value of your house, completing a household inventory, and deciding how much liability protection you want.Other variables include your zip code. If you live in a high-crime area, for example, insurance premiums will be higher. Companies also take into account the size of your house, how close it is to a fire hydrant, the condition of your plumbing, heating and electrical systems, how many claims were filed against the home you’re seeking to insure, and even details like your credit score that reflect on how responsible a consumer – and, therefore, a homeowner – you are.

    Shop around and do your research when it comes to homeowner’s insurance coverage. Ask questions like, “If a sprinkler head breaks in the yard and my basement floods, will I be covered?” You might be surprised by the answer, and you don’t want to be caught off guard. This exact scenario happened to a friend of mine, and the insurance company denied the claim because the sprinkler head was outside the home, and not, in their view, technically attached to the property.

Stay tuned for a discussion of ways to save on your insurance coverage!

Jack Meyers

The Meyers Group
jackestate@aol.com 
303.263.3050
Twitter: @jackestate